CATHY CARUTH UNCLAIMED EXPERIENCE PDF

January 1, Jess Much of the book had little relevance to my work with trauma narratives, howeever it is essential I read Caruths work. I enjoyed it for the most part, but have to admit to skimming most of the last chapter on Lacan, Freud, and memory due to the circuitous nature of the argument that caruth was laying out. More than anything, it was a fine example of how you can actually say the same thing 20 different ways. I look forward to reading her other works on trauma. The author is well known for her work on trauma theory. Caruth applies trauma theory to works by Freud, Kant, and Lacan, among others.

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January 1, Jess Much of the book had little relevance to my work with trauma narratives, howeever it is essential I read Caruths work. I enjoyed it for the most part, but have to admit to skimming most of the last chapter on Lacan, Freud, and memory due to the circuitous nature of the argument that caruth was laying out.

More than anything, it was a fine example of how you can actually say the same thing 20 different ways. I look forward to reading her other works on trauma. The author is well known for her work on trauma theory. Caruth applies trauma theory to works by Freud, Kant, and Lacan, among others. The most interesting part of Unclaimed, though, is not found in the book itself. One chapter analyzes the French film Hiroshima mon amour in terms of trauma theory. Naturally, I immediately had to rent and watch the movie for myself.

She has a brief and intense sexual encounter with a Japanese man. Perhaps the most moving element of the film, though, is the actual footage of bombing victims. I could only weep at the images of mangled, burned, and dying children. For someone so obsessed with atrocities committed in Europe during WWII, I am ashamed for practically ignoring the carnage perpetrated by Americans. If only Caruth could tell me how to reconcile myself with this part of my own history, with the trauma inflicted by American hands.

January 1, Lidiana de Moraes Interesting analysis of the idea of trauma as represented throughout history and narrative. But over all it is a great philosophical and theoretical work. The book tries to connect the theories of trauma from various schools of thought.

Heavily drawing from Freud, this book can be understood only if one has some knowledge on Freud, Lacan, and the Poststructuralists. No wonder, I found this a bit daunting. The writing was complex and circuitous. Maybe it was a point that Caruth was trying to This was a difficult read.

Maybe it was a point that Caruth was trying to make of the repetitive nature of traumatic thinking. Additionally, Caruth blatantly ignores the traumas of people of color. January 1, Francine Maessen The first three chapters were great and then she lost me.

Seems like she wrote two short books and mashed them together. That said, this book is in the curious position between a close reading of other pieces of literature with a focus on trauma, and an Introduction To. So it varies from requiring a good deal of knowledge of the source materials to offering some of the same introductory information repeatedly in a method more taxing to read than rewarding.

But the text soars when it pulls off an alchemy of introduction and close reading. I loved the implication that all theoretical reading is essentially an eternal waking into a misrecognition of the knowledge that theorists hope to obtain. Her interpretation of Lancan with Freud also helped me glean some insight into the purpose of the Holocaust documentary, Shoah, and why outside of the obvious atrocities some of the scenes were so hard to film and watch.

Every section is a leaving, of one individual being told in their waking life what analysts see in dreams, to tell the story of their burning. January 1, Dara History is happening at the very moment of Me writing this and You reading, but it "seems to be disappearing before our eyes", and Cathy Caruth wants to know how to think about such history and how we might witness it. Understanding this means gaining the ability to grasp the meaning of what-is-going-on-now.

With Us and with Others, because there is some ethics to memory. In "Unclaimed Experience" Caruth gives an excellent analysis of trauma. Presenting Her "After the End: Psychoanalysis in the Ashes of History" 10 march paper, She argues that there are three different kinds of witnesses: philosophical, phycoanalitical and literary, and all three witness through the literary.

Caruth enables herself to reach escaping phenomena of trauma by exploring relationships between knowing and not knowing, in which literature is particularly interested. She ponders about departure, falling, burning, and awakening and makes a lot of good readings in order to uncover their meaning, alongside with the meaning of forgetting, knowing, betraying the past and so on.

Changing things indirectly, just as trauma does. January 1, DAN D. I was happy to meet Cathy in person. That was when I decided to read this book and I was not disappointed.

Trauma has two sides: inescapability and survival — that is the key to the understanding of this great book. Especially, when I watched the film after reading, I noticed their laughter at the beginn I was happy to meet Cathy in person. Especially, when I watched the film after reading, I noticed their laughter at the beginning.

I recommend this one for everybody who loves reading and analyze. January 1, loafingcactus The book is chapters which are stand-alone essays as so many books are these days A quick read anyway.

January 1, Dave While this served as a useful first book about theorizing trauma, it left a lot of unanswered questions. Part of my confusion, however, may stem from the de Man essay that felt forced into the book. While I understand that this is a collection of progressive essays, a little more connection between the Freud essays and those about de Man and the idea of falling While this served as a useful first book about theorizing trauma, it left a lot of unanswered questions.

While I understand that this is a collection of progressive essays, a little more connection between the Freud essays and those about de Man and the idea of falling would have been helpful. January 1, Chongmin Alicia A lucid and concise account of trauma theory with very helpful signposting throughout the text, which approaches trauma theory through application rather than giving an outline of what it might constitute.

Adding a focus on voice and language to trauma theory breaks down barriers that made trauma theory a little stale and opens it up to new interpretations. Very well done! January 1, Pete Faziani This text is very interesting and also very complex. The concepts are hinged on a reader being familiar with the work of Freud. Too much emphasis on Freud and not enough exploration of the narrative impulse.

January 1, The wound and the voice and the repetition I hate Freud. Quite devotedly. January 1, Brooke Essential thesis book. I owe Cathy Caruth a serious thank you note for explaining trauma theory in a way that actually made a lick of sense. January 1, Stedwards Pivotal moment in trauma studies in s.

January 1, Malteschuldt I realy like this book, but its realy kind of difficult to grasp her point sometimes.

I realy like this book, but its realy kind of difficult to grasp her point sometimes.

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